Wk 10-Artist Conversation-Matthew Dumpit

Artist: Matthew Dumpit

Gallery: Marilyn Werby Gallery

Title of work: N/A

Artist Conversation with Matthew Dumpit

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This week I spoke to Matthew Dumpit, Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) student. Matthew is a senior and will be graduating this semester.  Matthew’s work, for this week, consisted of many thin wire sculptures. I didn’t count exactly how many total pieces were in his gallery but it was somewhere over 20. A majority of the pieces were made from thin wire and they were functional. All of Matthew’s sculptures on the wall were interactive and moved when the viewer turned the crane or lever attached to it. There was a larger scale of one of his sculptures in the middle of the room which also operated on a lever system, allowing the viewers to interact with the piece. So, to give you a better idea of his gallery, there were about 15 sculptures on two of the walls. Two big sculptures in the main floor of the gallery and then a smaller piece that was towards the corner. The piece that was in the corner wasn’t wire but was a copper and brass plate with light shining on it. The interesting thing with all of Matthew’s pieces was that he had the lights in the gallery set up so that his sculptures either created a shadow or left a reflection.

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As I spoke to Matthew, he was very interested in the idea that each object itself, when seen from a different point of view may look completely different; especially one that casts a shadow. The pieces are really small and complex since they are made with many pieces of wire. It took Matthew a minimum of two hours and a maximum of two days to finish one of the sculptures, it all just depended on the complexity of the design.

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Also, from just reading Matthew’s mission statement he made it clear that he is very interested in mechanics and emotion. The process of motion in objects is what highly fascinates him. Matthew was trying to convey this interest to the audience by making his pieces with many geometric shapes and the functionality that they can be moved with a crank or lever. Emotions are what started each work for Matthew. As he continued to work on his pieces those emotions were lost because he was so focused on the creative process of each sculpture. Through Matthews experiences of creating each piece, he wanted the audience to be able to have emotions of their own as they interacted with his work.

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When I first saw Matthew’s work it reminded me of the first designs of wings on an airplane from back in the day. It was very cool being able to interact with his work since most galleries you can’t touch the art. But I understand Matthew’s interest with motion. I am a Kinesiology major so that is part of my studies! It was interesting seeing the geometric shapes and how they changed shapes once you moved the crank. It definitely is a more robotic type of movement but it still has a sense of fluidity. But what I really liked is the idea that everything casts a shadow and that things are seen from different points of view by everyone. Beauty really is in the eye of the beholder. We all see things differently and it is up to us to perceive life and everything in it. The world and universe is huge and its hard to perceive all objects and situations. However, with each one of those experiences, we cope and modify that experience in our heads which makes it easier to live.

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Matthew doesn’t have a website and I couldn’t find him on any social media sites so, here is his email if you want to ask him any questions about his work md2151@gmail.com.

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